All in Delhi

When in Delhi, it is only fitting to visit Rajghat, the memorial site of Mahatma Gandhi.

The black marble slab marks the cremation site, while an eternal flame burns in a glass box and the words "Hai Ram" (Oh God) in Hindi are inscribed on the front. Words which are thought to have been Gandhi's last.

For both young and old, tourists and locals, it is a popular site of meditation, worship and respect.

The perfect time to visit the Lotus Temple was at sunset, a sight beautiful to see.

It is open to all visitors, of all religions, which is the basis of Bahai faith, making it simply a house of worship; a place of prayer and meditation.

The temple is made of marble, cemet and sand and was finished in 1986, designed by Persian architect Fariborz Sahba, and took 800 engineers and artisans and 10 years to complete.

Shoes have to be taken off and photography is not allowed inside the temple, but there is enough beauty in it's incredible structure and surroundings to take in.

One of the first stops of sites seen was the Qutab Minar, a 72.5 meter tall tower, made in 1192 of sandstone and marble. A World Heritage Site having survived lightning storms and the test of time, the Qutab Minar has remained an impressive structure of unique and beautiful Islamic design.

They no longer allow people to climb up it and it's already begining to lean, but I'm not the first to notice, apparently, it started to lean shortly after it was built.

Here is a journey through the Qutab complex....in all its ancient Mughal glory.